'16-'17 General Discussion for Lesson 3.6


#1

Use this thread to discuss your questions and comments about how to run the lesson.


#2

#3

Hi there, I’m looking for an exemplar/ most efficient 3x3 grid. This is what I wrote with blocks. Got it down to 27 lines (including end brackets on their own line. I want to see other solutions! Please share:


1.     turnLeft();
2.     turnLeft();
3.     turnLeft();
4.     drawShape1();
5.     drawShape1();
6.     drawShape1();
7.     drawShape1();
8.     drawSide();
9.     drawSide();
10.     drawSide();
11.     drawSide();
12.     turnLeft();
13.     function drawShape1() {
14.       drawSide2();
15.       drawSide();
16.       drawSide2();
17.     }
18.     function drawSide() {
19.       moveForward();
20.       moveForward();
21.       moveForward();
22.       turnLeft();
23.     }
24.     function drawSide2() {
25.       moveForward();
26.       turnLeft();
27.     }

#4

Hi.This is an example from one of my students. Also 27 lines.


#5

Here’s one of my student’s interesting solution:


#6

Wow 18 lines of code!! Thanks for sharing!


#7

One thing that would be nice to be able to do in Code.org is actually restrict students from moving ahead. I had several that moved ahead quickly to this challenge on code.org and then they didn’t get what the purpose of the worksheet was. They were like I already did it why do I have to do this.


#8

This ability is under development now (along with a bunch of other cool stuff) with target release for mid-june. Get your hopes up!

-Baker
CSP Team


#9

Oh hey thanks for the information Baker that is really cool. Its such a tough situation because on one hand I love that I have some students that just want to keep going and learn more. But on the other hand it is kind of frustrating that they are getting so far ahead.

I am finding it tough to balance this class. Most can really fly through this stuff quick that I was thinking maybe I should make some of this self paced at some point.But I am glad to hear a new feature that might solve this problem is coming.

Keep up the great work this is some fantastic curriculum.


#10

acutally, if i understand your request, @ben_kuehl this feature is already available! to make a lesson hidden from students, you first need to select a section, then you can choose to hide or make visible. see the example below, which starts here: https://studio.code.org/s/csp5


#11

Oh my you are so right. That is awesome. I wish I would have remembered that because I do remember seeing that. The kids who went ahead are not going to be happy with me next class, but I have corrected what is visible and what isn’t.


#12

This lesson is a good one to do unplugged on the whiteboard to help students understand the need for writing functions.

To do so, I printed out the cross here four times (fit-to-page, so it’s large enough) to assemble a snowflake, and printed a turtle arrow which I attached to a magnet.



#13

I LOVE this idea!!! I think sometimes students over use the “guess and check” method for programming, this shows them HOW to think before they press “run”. Thanks for sharing!


#16

15 lines and I’m sure there is a more efficient way.

Here’s a decent one. Asking the students to go back and try it again after they know functions and parameters is a fun challenge.


#17

Here’s 13 lines and I’m thinking once they know arrays, it could possibly be reduced.


#18

I’m giving up for now.

I got 12 lines of code for the 3 by 3 Grid Challenge

Once the students know function, parameters and loops, this is a fun challenge.

Enjoy