Plagiarized Projects

A few of my students recently submitted identical projects for Unit 3 Lesson 22. If we were at school, I would think that they had shared their ideas. However, since we went virtual and these students rarely communicated with each other in class before, I am wondering if they found the project through the public share. How can I search for past projects that were created by other people? Do the project that are remixed carry identifiable information about the original creator that cannot be changed?

Any thoughts on how to reduce “cheating” or “sharing” would be helpful.

Below is the code for the game. The costumes in the game include an alien, a hamburger, a fence and a cactus:
// Create your variables here
var score = 0;
var itemLocation = randomNumber(410, 500);

// Create your sprites here
var player = createSprite(50, 270);
player.setAnimation(“alienUp”);
player.scale = 0.15;
var item = createSprite(200, 200);
item.setAnimation(“burger_1”);
item.scale = 0.1;
item.velocityX = -3;
var obstacle = createSprite(300, 275);
obstacle.setAnimation(“fence_wood_1”);
obstacle.scale = 0.4;
obstacle.velocityX = -2;
var obstacle2 = createSprite(200, 275);
obstacle2.setAnimation(“cactus_1”);
obstacle2.scale = 0.4;
obstacle2.velocityX = -2;
var sun = createSprite(350, 50);
sun.setAnimation(“sun”);
sun.scale = 0.5;

var sun2 = createSprite(350, 50);
sun2.setAnimation(“sun2”);
sun2.scale = 0.5;

function draw() {
// draw background
if (score > 10) {
displayBackground2();
} else {
displayBackground();
}
// update sprites
displayScore();
playerFall();
controlPlayer();
itemsLoop();
collectItems();
drawSprites();
checkScore();
}

// Create your functions here
function displayBackground() {
background(“skyBlue”);
noStroke();
fill(“tan”);
rect(0, 300, 400, 100);
}
function displayBackground2() {
background(“darkBlue”);
noStroke();
fill(“green”);
rect(0, 300, 400, 100);
}

function displayScore() {
textSize(20);
fill(“black”);
text(“Score:”, 10, 25);
text(score, 70, 25);
}

function controlPlayer() {
if (keyDown(“right”)) {
obstacle.x = obstacle.x - 2;
obstacle2.x = obstacle2.x - 2;
}
if (keyDown(“up”)) {
player.velocityY = player.velocityY - 0.4;
}
if (keyDown(“down”)) {
player.setAnimation(“alienUp”);
player.y = player.y + 2;
}
}

function playerFall() {
if (player.y < 140) {
player.velocityY = player.velocityY + 0.75;
} else if ((player.y < 265)) {
player.velocityY = player.velocityY + 0.25;
}
}

function itemsLoop() {
var speed = randomNumber(-2, -7);
if (obstacle.x < -15) {
obstacle.x = randomNumber(410, 550);
obstacle.y = 275;
obstacle.velocityX = speed;
}
if (obstacle2.x < -15) {
obstacle2.x = randomNumber(410, 550);
obstacle2.y = 275;
obstacle2.velocityX = speed;
}
if (item.x < -15) {
item.x = itemLocation;
item.y = randomNumber(100, 235);
item.velocityX = speed;
}
}

function collectItems() {
if (player.isTouching(item)) {
score = score + 2;
item.x = -20;
}
if (player.isTouching(obstacle)) {
score = score - 1;
obstacle.x = -50;
}
if (player.isTouching(obstacle2)) {
score = score - 1;
obstacle2.x = -50;
}
}

function checkScore() {
if (score < -10) {
background(“red”);
fill(“yellow”);
textSize(35);
text(“Game Over”, 115, 100);
} else if ((score < 0)) {
sun2.setAnimation(“sun2”);
} else {
sun.setAnimation(“sun”);
}
}

It would be possible for a student to remix a game from the public projects. I don’t think there’s any way for you to tell for sure that they have done this, unfortunately.

The public projects can be seen here:

I have had this happen before and I was able to address it by asking the student to explain the code to me. Of course that was when we were in a classroom together and I was able to do it in a non-threatening way. The student admitted they had copied some of the code and I was able to help them come up with their own idea.

In this situation, I may ask the student if they had collaborated with another student as their project was very similar to the project of another student and see what they say.

Here’s a previous thread on this related situation.

I’d love to hear from others on successful approaches to combatting this.

Mike