Problem solving skills of CODE? against Scratch


#1

What are the differences between Scratch and Code.org? I need to understand what I’m trying to teach kids on grade 3-4 programming using CODE.ORG but, I faced rejection because I couldn’t answer the question of (what is my contribution to knowledge)

in addition to I want to write my thesis on the effectiveness of programming that can improve the problem skills, but, the school says why COD, not scratch!

what is my contribution to knowledge?

I know that CODE.ORG is more effective but, how to convince them !?
what is problem solving skills of COD? against Scratch


#2

Can you clarify the question of “what is my contribution to knowledge?”

To make sure I’m following correctly, you are saying your school wants you to use Scratch, but you are trying to convince them code.org is better?

Lastly, what aspects of code.org are you referring to? Code.org feature many programming puzzles (like the stuff with Angry Birds, Minecraft, Frozen, etc.), but in terms of programming environments comparable to Scratch, code.org as Play Lab, Art Lab, Game Lab, and App Lab - all block-based like Scratch (but each with a different target purpose and audience).


#3

Norah,
Scratch is a platform for creating coding projects. Code.org’s CS Fundamentals courses are a full curriculum, which means it’s a complete set of experiences designed to work together to teach specific concepts. Students learn about specific computer science concepts (loops, debugging, etc.) through unplugged activities, online puzzles, and open-ended projects. Code.org’s tools are scaffolded and scoped to the particular lesson whereas Scratch gives you everything all at once. Scratch allows for greater diversity in student creations but can be overwhelming or confusing to beginners (students and teachers alike). I personally use both. If your school is asking you to use Scratch, I’d suggest a progression where you introduce a concept on Code.org and then explore it more deeply by creating something in Scratch using the same concept.
Hope that helps!
Mike


#4

Well said - great answer! Thanks Mike! I’ll pass this advice on to teachers at my CS Fundamentals workshops.


#5

thank you!
i really appreciate this advice


#6

yeeeeeeees true

so do i


#7

i needed more insight
but, thank you