Student Activity Guide - Where?


#1

When you click on the Activity Guide for the student, You get one with answers already filled in. Where is the blank one for students?


#2

Hi @tsilveus

(I’m editing my previous comment)

Students should see the completed Project Guide, with the answers, after they discuss what they think the sprites, variables, and functions would need to be to make the game.

They’ll have a chance to use a blank project guide when they are thinking about their own game in the end of the unit.

cheers,
Kevin


#3

So guessing we should start the students off with puzzle 2, which prompts them for their list of sprites and functions and what they control rather than starting them off with puzzle 1 which gives them the answers. Is that correct?


#4

I would start this lesson by having them complete bubble 2 which prompts them to make a list of information about the program before handing them the completed Project Guide to compare their answers with.

Discuss: Students should have individually created a list of variables, sprites, and functions they would create to make the defender game they played. Ask students to share their lists with a neighbor before discussing as a class.

Teaching Tip
Project Guide: The project guide is intentially filled out for students so that they can experience using it as a reference when programming. This should give them more context when filling out their own project guide in the next two lessons.

You can give each student their own copy for reference, but you might also choose to print one copy per pair, share digital copies, or just display the guide on the projector. So long as it is available for reference, any approach will work fine.

Distribute: Give each student or pair of students a copy of the Defender Game - Project Guide

Prompt: Compare the components of the game you thought would be included to the ones on this project guide. Do you notice any differences?