Unit 2 Lesson 4 Mini Project (20-21)

Does the work that student complete in this mini project move to other mini project? I try to figure it out but was unable. Thank you.

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It appears this question wasn’t answered?

Lesson 4, step 4 carries over to step 5. I expected it would then carry over to Lesson 7 and then Lesson 10 so students could build on what they started, but it did not.

Is the intent that students will design 3 different small web pages as practice before reaching the final unit Project in Lesson 12? Is it suggested that they do all 3 mini-lessons, OR should/could a teacher choose 1 mini-project (Lesson 4, 7 or 10) wherever it best fits students’ readiness for practice? Could the 3 mini-projects be on the same topic and eventually become pages in the unit Project?

I noticed the same thing. I expected Lesson 4 web project to move over to the next project area. Instead I had students consider their original topic and first web page. From there I asked that they now think of a new main idea for that topic. They came up with a new web page to add to the other with new information about the topic. I expect we will continue doing that and eventually build a menu to link all the pages together on the same topic. Hopefully… :crossed_fingers:

@loconnell,
I have passed this on to some of the curriculum people to look at, but you certainly could use it as mini-projects that a teacher could choose from.

It would also be nice to have the ability to add them to a larger project later, but I don’t believe that functionality is currently available to connect projects.

I’ll post back if I hear any updates!

Mike

@audrey.green - Thanks, Audrey! I like that idea as it builds on the first mini-project and leads to a multi-page site students can finalize at the end of the unit rather than just 1 page.

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@mwood - Thanks for passing it on.
As a work-around, I have successfully had students copy and paste from one lesson’s code to another, but for some it gets very confusing.

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:wave: Just to quickly chime in - this is the intent in the curriculum, where each mini-project is an opportunity for students to “start fresh” with a new project or new idea. This reasoning comes from:

  • Giving students multiple opportunities for creativity and self-expression by varying the projects, allowing them to have a “portfolio” of websites by the end of the course.

  • Giving students multiple opportunities to master concepts that ‘build’ on each other. For example: a student who still struggling with HTML during mini-project 1 has the chance to demonstrate mastery in mini-project 2

  • Narrowing the focus of each project so it’s easier for students & teachers to identify key-concepts for self-reflection and assessment. Mini-project 1 is focused on mastering HTML; mini project 2 is focused on mastering CSS

With all of that said: just because this is the intent doesn’t mean it’s the reality, and we definitely encourage folks to make decisions that are most responsive and engaging for their students. There are several ideas in this thread that sound like great ways to adapt these projects to serve the students in our classrooms, which is really awesome.

We’ve heard the desire for projects to build on each other so you could continue work from one project to the next, and we’re thinking about ways we can support this in future versions of the curriculum without being too prescriptive. For now, copy-and-pasting from one project to the next is the best solution if you’d like students to keep building on the same project as before.

Hope that helps!
Dan - Code.org Curriculum Writer

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