Code.org Project Guide, Peer Rubric, and Project Rubric - Google Sheets


#1

So I don’t like to use Google Docs where the kids are filling things out online. Sometimes, as they add information to a Google Doc, it pushes things down in weird ways. I also didn’t want to print all these documents off for all my students. I took the time to transfer all of these to Google Sheets, which is what I use quite often because I can lock things down to very specific cells students can edit. I also made one file and three separate sheets on that document. I don’t know if this is going to be helpful for anyone here, but I thought I would share it. I didn’t make any changes to any of the documents, other than moving it to Google Sheets.

Link To Project Documents - Google Sheets


#2

Dan,

This is great! Thanks for sharing.

Brad


#3

So this worked well but my biggest issues were this:

  1. When it came to peer sharing and grading, I had to figure out how to make sure I could get things graded correctly. I think next time, what I will do is remove the peer review rubric from the electronic file and give them that as paper. It was just very difficult to make sure things were shared correctly and then even harder to make sure I looked at the right documents when grading things. Technically, it would have been a lot easier if I had them just exchange computers instead of sharing the documents with each other, but as the Google Apps Admin at our school, I’m very much against letting other students have any access at all to other student accounts, even under supervision.
  2. I super wish Google Classroom had a better way of distributing Google Sheets documents. I made the document, then I locked all the cells for editing except those that the students needed to fill in. I set the editing rights to the owner, because I had made it. The problem is because of the way Google Classroom distributes assignments, it made each student the new owner of their own document (which makes sense). This though screwed up the editing permissions on specific cells. The students then had the ability to edit all the cells (which isn’t a huge deal because if they break something, they can just undo it). The real problem came when they shared the document for peer review. I had to have them remove the rights to edit the documents because the new students were not the owners, and then on the rubric, I had to have them remove the editing rights again so that I could provide the feedback.
  3. Lastly, I ended up just printing the rubric off and filling it in by hand. So much easier and faster.

#4

Dan,

Thank you for your reflection - this information helps out other teachers. Also I’d suggest using that feedback button in Google Classroom re: Google Sheets - they re typically responsive (sometimes I doubt they’ve consulted teachers at all, but they are quick to fix).

Brad