How are projects getting featured on the project screen?

I would like to understand how are projects getting on the top of the projects list.


here you can see that there are 8 projects that are “featured” on the screen. Those stay on the top for a long time.
I’ve often seen projects that have no code or almost no code in them being higher than good projects, on which people have spent hours on and have over 200 lines of code. Does anyone know how this works?

Hello!

This is a great question! Our featured projects are chosen by a rotating group of real-life people who work at Code.org. There’s no automated process; anything posted in the Public gallery has a chance at being chosen as a featured project. There are lots of factors in an app that we value beyond just how complex the code is.

Sometimes we look at the design of the app, especially if it looks like creative and unique artwork or sounds have been used, or if the user experience is especially easy to follow and navigate.

Sometimes we look at the purpose of an app, especially if it’s been created to solve a real-world problem or address an issue in the community.

Sometimes we look at how an app uses code creatively or unexpectedly to solve a problem. Or how an app uses code for personal creativity or self-expression.

Sometimes we look at apps that elicit an emotional response. They make us laugh. Or smile. Or reflect thoughtfully. Or have a fond memory.

And yes - sometimes the apps we feature perform complicated tasks using many many many lines of code. And sometimes they perform simple tasks using a few lines of code. Sometimes we even feature apps that are unfinished or have bugs in them. We don’t get a chance to view all the apps that people make, but we certainly appreciate a wide variety of them, and we hope you appreciate the ones we feature too!

-Dan
Code.org Curriculum Writer

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Public projects are commonly filled with spam and effortless remixes. Would it be possible for a game that would have otherwise been a featured project, yet buried by the spam and end up being forgotten about?

Another issue is, a remix of one my projects has been featured before (Alien Defense). The original game had me creditted as the original creator. Due to the constant remixing, the featured remix had the credits changed. Since I was the creator of the game, I believe it is unfair that a remix of my game ended up getting featured, as opposed to my own. Are the people at code.org ok with this? If not, would I be able to do anything about this?

The constantly remixing of projects in code.org has lead me it to implement security into some of my projects. I won’t go in detail how it works, but it would detect remixes and perform actions such as putting a black screen that redirects to the original game. This is kind of a last resort to protect from remixes, but other than that, there is no real way to defend against remixes and people taking credit for stuff they didn’t make.

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Where are the featured projects? Is it the same as Public Projects?

Featured projects always stay on the top of the projects list, that’s why people usually call them featured.

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