Day 2-3 Scratch - Name Project


#1

For my challenge I will use the Day 2-3 Name Project Lesson.


#2

I am going to complete the lessons for Day 2-3 Scratch - Name Project.


#3

For the teaching of this lesson, I will use the following instructional tools:
–Journal: Write about and explain what you learned from the last class when we started with a general overview of Scratch. Then, using only 5 words, sum up either what Scratch is or what it’s main purpose is if you were explaining it to someone else.
–Share journal entries with class. (Ask for volunteers.)
–Students will use individual whiteboards and respond with the correct answer to review pertinent new vocabulary necessary for Scratch. I am going to use the vocabulary terms thomasb shared with the group. This will allow students to individually recall and share their answers. Students who did not get the correct answer, can learn from their peers and hearing the terminology again aloud. This will be a non-graded introductory activity. After completion of the unit and additional hands-on use of the vocabulary, I will use the same vocabulary as a graded assessment tool.
–Review the name project sample and allow a time for questions and reflection. Review the rubric. I will include an additional category as discussed in my initial thoughts for students to choose a way to “WOW” me and earn points for doing so. This is to encourage students to go above meeting the basic requirements.
–Students will create a name project and share it with the teacher. Students will be encouraged to learn through trial and error and enjoy the process. All students will use their own headphones and include sound.
*What was difficult/enjoyable about teaching this lesson: This was a new concept for many students. Students have used Code.org before but were not used to the sprites in Scratch. However, it was enjoyable for me to watch them as they figured out all of the cool motions and sounds they could create. Students seemed to also enjoy the opportunity to be creative.
*Additional Resources: I used my class set of whiteboards, markers, and erasers. Students used their own journals and headphones. No other resources necessary.
*Extension Activity: After every student completed the name activity and shared it with me to critique and give feedback on, I had students come up with any word they wanted to and create an animated Scratch program to bring that word to life, using elements that describe the word itself. For instance, my example was “FOOD” with the word being created and animated with different kinds of foods. The letters also moved into a mouth. This allowed students to have an opportunity to choose their own topic of interest and take it as far as they wanted to. I also gave students an opportunity to share with their peers their creations on the overhead projector. This encouraged students to do their best so they could “show off” their projects to their peers. I found they really liked this, too. However, those who were uncomfortable sharing, were not required to.
*Teaching Feedback: I found that this lesson required quite a bit of time and some students required extra attention to grasp the concept. Allowing their peers who “got it” assist them seemed more advantageous then having me try to keep them engaged. I also liked the entire class completing their names and then having them veer off on their own to additionally explore.
I probably would give students additional time upfront to try out Scratch before they actually created their name project. Allowing them some time to just play around and not have to follow any rules would give them a better opportunity to become more comfortable with all of the many things they can do in the program.


#4

@katrina_dunlap The breakdown of the lesson is a great way to share how you got the students into the lesson, explored the concept and wrapped it up.

The teaching feedback is a very important piece as you can use your reflection as you plan to teach the course next year.

The ability for peers to go around helping each other is great as this is what the course builds up to through out the curriculum. If students feel the class is a safe environment and they have built relationships with peers, they have that desire to appreciate feedback and help.

The time students get to explore before they are giving guidelines is crucial so students own their understanding rather than feel like they are always being told - I try to use a little scaffolding when they explore so they can write down what they notice about Scratch and have them check in with the class after 5 or 10 minutes to share out what they discovered while exploring. It is a fun way to learn bits of information as it seems useful to them on the different projects.


#5

Extended Activity: After students create their name have them add an additional sprite to the project.

Very important - Check to verify that all students have logged in successfully.
Have students link to a page so that the teacher can view all work, assess work, and show to other students.

I followed the Lessons, they are well prepared. Students enjoyed working with scratch. Have students review the drop and drag code.


#6

#7

@jrather_terry I found that in Scratch I could set up classes and within the class create studios for each project. Students could share their project with me and the grownup making it easier to do peer reviews and correct all in one place.


#8

I will do the Day 2-3 Name Project as my challenge. I’m certain its going to be a challenge for me.


#9

@swood

Day 2-3 is a really fun activity. It can be a great time for students to explore Scratch and see what the different blocks do. If you are new to Scratch - it is a great time to be a lead learner.


#10

I will be completing lesson for days 2 - 3. I know a little about Scratch, so I will go over it myself before doing it with the students.


#11

Advice: I gave the students a link to the introductory tutorials in Scratch, as an extra resource. During class, I realized that the videos are blocked on my student computers. I talked to the tech guys and they unblocked them for me, but it took a few days. If you plan to use the videos, make sure you check to see if they are blocked on student computers.

I set up a studio in Scratch and had the students add projects to the studio. This way they could see each other’s projects. Students submitted a URL in Canvas for grading.

The lesson was well written, so I followed the plan and one modification. Some of my students have really long names. To keep it equitable for all students, I only required them to do 3 letters. Some did a nick name, some did initials, and others did their entire name.

Extension: Advanced students added more sprites and different behaviors.

Here’s a link to the sample project I created. It’s very simple.


#12

@kaylynn_holmes Great way to take on the lead learner role by creating projects in Scratch as well.


#13

#14

That’s a great idea for an extension! Any practice they can get is very helpful.


#15

I really like the idea of setting up a studio in Scratch for all the students to see other’s work - what a great idea!


#16

@alison_ence @kaylynn_holmes

I too like the idea of being able to set up a class with studios. It has made managing student work easier and give them a chance to do peer reviews with warm and cool feedback easier as well.

Are you aware of the share tree in the bottom right hand side of the students stage? It lets you know if they are they original author of the project or if they remixed it from someone else.

Some students don’t think teachers pay attention to who the original author is when sharing and remixing and still want full credit, so just be aware of that feature to check who has done the original work.


#17

Day 2-3

I did as many teachers did and created my class accounts. To make it easier for my students to login I used there unique student iD numbers and a password that is the same for every student. Instead of trying to have every student view the videos on their own I showed the video for the name project on the white board. I leave the video and allow the students to ask for what parts need to be reviewed. I also show the students where the video is just in case they were a little more advanced than some other students. I setup for the studios for my class but realized that my students, where not saving or posting them to the studio. So there was a slight learning curve on saving their assignment.


#18

Here is my lesson plan for days 2-3.
-Journal: What do you remember about Scratch from yesterday?
What do some of the blocks do? Why are we learning scratch?
-Think pair share your journal entries (partner).
-Pick 4-5 groups to discuss!
-Review the rubric from last class on name project. Show some examples of name projects.
-I will show my students the tutorial again just for review.
-Students will create the name project. Before turning this in, I will walk around the room to make sure they are not rushing.
-I have contests in my class. The top 2 projects will be displayed on the projector and will be rewarded PBIS points( reward system within the school). My students LOVE contests!

-I loved this activity. They show their creativity and enjoy helping each other out.

-I encourage students to bring their own headphones for this.

-Extension activity—I took Katrina dunlaps idea—SUCH A GOOD IDEA! “After every student completed the name activity and shared it with me to critique and give feedback on, I had students come up with any word they wanted to and create an animated Scratch program to bring that word to life, using elements that describe the word itself. For instance, my example was “FOOD” with the word being created and animated with different kinds of foods. The letters also moved into a mouth. This allowed students to have an opportunity to choose their own topic of interest and take it as far as they wanted to. I also gave students an opportunity to share with their peers their creations on the overhead projector. This encouraged students to do their best so they could “show off” their projects to their peers. I found they really liked this, too. However, those who were uncomfortable sharing, were not required to.”

-Feedback: I feel as though this is a good intro to Scratch. I ended letting students who finished early walking around and being the helpers in class. I also had students walk around and look at everyone’s work. They really enjoyed this!


#19

I learned this too, this really helps


#20

Thanks for letting me know about the share tree! I did not know what that was.